The High School Cliff: College Freshmen Lack Preparation

Too many unprepared students will certainly be languishing in their freshman year. Two-thirds of high school students are enrolling in college, but just one-third are prepared for their course load.

The face of a high school graduate. (Photo Source: CollegeDegrees360 http://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/)

The face of a high school graduate. (Photo Source: CollegeDegrees360 http://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/)

Four out of ten high school graduates are forced to take basic classes such as English and Math because they did not match the minimal expectations of their university. This leads to a very stressful game of catch-up.

The face of a freshman. (Photo Source: CollegeDegrees360 http://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/)

The face of a freshman. (Photo Source: CollegeDegrees360 http://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/)

The lack of support for new college undergraduates explains another problem: rising dropout rates. Two-thirds of students who must take those remedial classes do not earn their degree within six years. While college attendance rates are at an all-time high, the success rate is actually even much lower. This lack of preparedness transfers to the career world as well.

(Photo Source: http://mrg.bz/0L93Kh)

 Recently, President Obama announced he wants to “shake-up” the higher education system, lowering the cost barrier and easing credit completion. This policy shift will likely increase college enrollment and lower the drop-out rate, but it does not solve the lack of sufficient support for students.

On top of struggling undergraduates, we will (and already have) seen struggling graduates in the job market, leading to a dwindling employer confidence.

That is why Scholar Hero are helping university students help each other. We hope that our eco-system of academic support will curb the problem of unpreparedness and empower the enrolled to be more prepared.

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